A Brief Look on How a Fast-Casual Food Chain is Tackling Fast-Fashion

By: Sharla


In a recent post on The Counter, which is “ a nonprofit, independent, nonpartisan newsroom investigating the forces shaping how and what America eats”, they touched on how the food and fashion industries may possibly be converging, namely, through a beloved fast-casual chain, Chipotle who is “upcycling” their avocado pits into brand wear. 



While it is not for certain that doing so would alleviate and remove potential contributions of harmful environmental impact by the food industry, it does provide some hope of [re]discovering ways to deal with food waste. 


Yet, as has been done in the past with many other restaurants in the food industry, Chipotle’s sustainability efforts are not always thought or carried out with due diligence. As part of our industrialized economy, many businesses within the food and fashion industry seek to appeal to the masses. But we owe ourselves and each other healthier lives and livelihoods. It is no secret that our food -- and yes, our clothing -- is a reflection of our global economy and society. And while Chipotle’s upcycled avocado shirts have sold out, it is only a small step towards what we should actually be doing: revolutionizing the way we do business. And don’t me wrong -- I love Chipotle! -- however we need to think and do better. 



CLOVO is a brand that seeks to do just that. Perhaps you may have heard of us already - either through word of mouth, our social media, Kickstarter, or website - but we hold the “Clothing Revolution” in its truest possible form, with environmental sustainability, high-quality comfort, and women empowerment at the center of our work. All of these ideals and values are what make any business great, and we seek to manifest that in our products. That is why for our launch product, Evertights, we chose Tencel over fully-synthetic fibers such as Nylon which causes the quick wear, itchiness, and harmful environmental impact that most pantyhose provide. You can learn more about why we use Tencel here


Chipotle is not the only chain trying to shed a light on our current environmental issues, but now more than ever, it is so imperative to shed a light within the food/agriculture and fashion industries as they are more intertwined than we think. We not only need individuals and businesses to pursue ethical production practices, but who also challenge quick fabrications, and are committed to collaborative innovations that lead to real progress on such complex issues. After all, the real cost is not just your bank account, it’s the harm done to the environment, our communities, and our bodies. Next time you might even ask yourself, where does my food come from and go? The same goes for the next piece of clothing too. 




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